Event: Can the World Afford Religion?

As part of the Faith Interviews, organised by the the Religion and Society programme, Professor Sir John Sulston (humanist and Nobel Prize Winner for work on the genome) will be interviewed by Andrew Brown of The Guardian.
WEDS, 7TH NOVEMBER 2012, 5.30 – 7.00 RUSI, 61 Whitehall, London, SW1A 2ET

To register for a free place, email p.ainsworth@lancaster.ac.uk

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Call for Papers – New Forms of Public Religion 5-7 September 2012


Please see below, details of CFP for a conference on New Forms of Public Religion organised as part of the  AHRC/ESRC funded Religion and Society Programme. The conference will take place at the Divinity School, St John’s College, Cambridge, CB2 1TW

Call for Papers

The fact that religion has not privatised, but remains an important aspect of public life, is now well recognised.  But talk of ‘public religion’ can be vague and unfocused. The aim of this conference is to explore – with new findings – the forms which public religion is taking today, not only in the West, but elsewhere in an increasingly connected world.

The conference streams indicate the main arenas in relation to which public religion will be discussed, and on which papers are invited. Additional suggestions are also welcome:

  • The Market and Religion
  • Politics and Religion
  • Law and Religion
  • Religion, Media and Civil Society
  • Violence (State and Non-state) and Religion
  • Religion in Public Places and Spaces
  • Religion, Health and Welfare
  • Religion and Education
  • Religion and Migration

Speakers include:

Lori Beaman

José Casanova

The Rt Hon Charles Clarke

Grace Davie

Pamela Dickey-Young

Stewart Hoover

The Rt Revd Graham James

Meredith McGuire

Nancy Nason-Clark

Jim Spickard

Linda Woodhead

The conference will showcase thirty or so projects funded by the Religion and Society Programme which have new findings in this area. These will be supplemented by the papers received through this open call.

Individual paper proposals (max. 200 words) should be submitted to:  Peta Ainsworth:  p.ainsworth@lancaster.ac.uk by 30th April 2012.

The conference is subsidised by the sponsors and costs £100 per delegate, £50 for postgraduates/unwaged (for the entire conference) or £50 per day, £25 for postgraduates/unwaged.  The conference fee excludes accommodation and evening meals.  For further details and registration go to:http://www.religionandsociety.org.uk/events/programme_events/show/new_forms_of_public_religion

A limited number of bursaries are available for postgraduates in the UK who need to travel some distance to Cambridge.  Please send an email with your registration form to Peta Ainsworth stating in one paragraph why you require assistance and how much your travel costs will be.

Reminder: What have we learned about Radicalisation? 7 March 2012

Wednesday 07 March 2012, 5.30-7pm, 61 Whitehall

Details below or visit the Religion and Society webpage

Since 9/11 and 7/7 billions have been invested in tackling and understanding religious radicalisation. This debate brings together academic and policy experts to consider what have we learned:

About its nature and causes?

About parallels and precedents?

About the effect of policies designed to tackle the problem?

About future threats and where we go from here?

Download the academics’ presentations below, under their photographs

Register your place

If you would like to take part in the debate, please email

p.ainsworth@lancaster.ac.uk

When registering, please let us know which of the following categories best describes you ‘Academic’, ‘Faith-based Organisations and Voluntary Sector’, ‘Media’, ‘Policy’, ‘Religious Communities’ or ‘Other’

Matthew Francis

Matthew Francis

View website

Mat is editor of radicalisationresearch.org for the Religion and Society Programme and Researcher on the Religious Literacy Leadership Programme.

 

Mark Sedgwick

Mark SedgwickView website

Mark is a Professor in the Department of Culture and Society, Aarhus University. His publications include Muhammad Abduh (2009) and he recently wrote a piece for radicalisationresearch.org

 

Marat Shterin

Marat ShterinView website

Dr Shterin is Lecturer in Sociology of Religion at King’s College London. His publications include Dying for Faith co-authored with Madawi Al-Rasheed (2009) and he recently co-edited a special issue of Religion, State and Society.

 

Mehdi Hasan

Mehdi Hasan View website

Mehdi is the New Statesman’s Senior Editor (Politics).

 

Ed Husain

Ed HusainView website

Ed is co-founder of the Quilliam Foundation and author of The Islamist (2007).He is currently a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, Washington, DC.

CFP: Sacred Practices of Everyday Life

A conference of interest of that perhaps has space for a nonreligious and civic perspective on the notion of the Sacred?

AHRC/ESRC RELIGION AND SOCIETY PROGRAMME

9th to 11th May 2012

The John McIntyre Conference Centre (Edinburgh University), 18 Holyrood Park Road, Edinburgh, EH16 5AY

Call for Papers

Roadside shrines; divorce parties; tattoos made with ink containing a loved one’s ashes; spiritual retreats; prayer cairns; naming ceremonies; healing rituals; contacts with the dead: however ‘disenchanted’ the world may be, there is plenty of evidence of enchantment and re-enchantment all around. Life and death are still rendered meaningful through ancient and reinvented practices, rituals, beliefs and symbols which attach sacredness and significance to what would otherwise be merely mundane.

The purpose of the conference is to explore new evidence, analysis and theory concerning the sacred practices of everyday life. There is a particular focus on the varied ways in which the life course is being re-enchanted in the 21st century, but papers looking at other eras and/or larger forms of sacred practice (e.g. civic rituals) are also welcome. The scope is global.

The conference will showcase thirty or so projects funded by the Religion and Society Programme which have new findings in this area. These will be supplemented by the papers received through this open call.

The conference streams are:

  • Formation and Cultivation
  • ·Life-styles and (After)Death-styles
  • Sex, Life and Love
  • Gods, Spirits and the Sacred
  • Fate, Destiny and the Future
  • Identity, Solidarity and Conflict
  • Suffering, Healing and Well Being
  • Objects, Language, Rituals and Consumption

Individual paper proposals (max. 200 words) should be submitted to:

Peta Ainsworth: p.ainsworth@lancaster.ac.uk by 29th February 2012.

The conference is subsidised by the sponsors and costs £95 per delegate, £60 for postgraduates/unwaged (for the entire conference) or £45 per day, £30 for postgraduates/unwaged. The conference fee excludes accommodation and conference dinner. For further details and registration go to: http://www.religionandsociety.org.uk/events/programme_events/show/sacred_practices_of_everyday_life

Peta Ainsworth

Administrator

AHRC/ESRC Religion & Society Programme

C14 FASS Building

County South

Lancaster University

Lancaster LA1 4YD

Tel. (01524) 510826

http://www.religionandsociety.org.uk