NSRN Recruiting Website Editor

As part of our ongoing development of the NSRN and our online presence, we are seeking a new member of our online team. This individual will take on the role of Managing Editor, and will be responsible for the general overseeing and maintenance of website, co-ordinating of the NSRN Online team, and undertaking a refurbishment/redevelopment of the existing website.

The successful applicant should:

  • Be involved – whether as a student (of any level), a professional academic, or independent researcher – within the academic study of nonreligion and secularity (broadly conceived)
  • Have a working knowledge of WordPress, in addition to general computing and social media skills.
  • Be a reliable and independent worker, able to both delegate tasks and work as part of a team.

All roles within the NSRN are unpaid; however, we hope that the chance to be involved in a major international hub for the study of nonreligion, secularity and related concepts, the opportunities which accompany this, and the chance to creatively make their mark on our web presence will be acceptable compensation for the efforts of the successful applicant.

If you are interested in this position, please send an academic CV accompanied by a brief note of interest of no more than 500 words detailing your suitability for the role, relevant experience, and any suggestions you may have for further developments of the NSRN’s website and online presence and how you might implement these. These materials, and any questions relating to the position, should be directed to NSRN Co-Director Christopher R. Cotter at c.cotter@lancaster.ac.uk by 6 November 2015.

Please feel free to circulate this advert to relevant colleagues and networks. A PDF can be downloaded below.

NSRN Managing Editor Advert (PDF)

Advertisements

NSRN Annual Lecture 2015: Outline of a Theory of Religious-Secular Competition

We are delighted to announce our 2015 Annual Lecture, presented in cooperation with the Department of Social Anthropology & Cultural Studies (ISEK) at the University of Zurich, and the Emmy Noether-project “The Diversity of Nonreligion.”

Outline of a Theory of Religious-Secular Competition

Prof. Dr. Jörg Stolz (University of Lausanne)

Thursday, November 12, 2015, 6pm

Venue: University of Zurich (UZH) Oerlikon Campus Andreasstr. 15, 8050 Zurich Room: AND 3.02/06 (3rd floor)

A flyer can be downloaded here (pdf).

NSRN Annual Lecture

New Books in NSRN Book Series

The NSRN and De Gruyter are pleased to announce the first three publications in their book seriesReligion and its Others: Studies in Religion, Nonreligion, and Secularity:

For more on the series, see here: https://nsrn.net/book-series/

Download Flyer

NSRN Series 2

Event: American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting

American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting

22-25 November 2014

San Diego, CA, USA

The American Academy of Religion brings thousands of professors and students, authors and publishers, religious leaders and interested laypersons to its Annual Meeting each year. Co-hosted with the Society of Biblical Literature, the Annual Meetings are the largest events of the year in the fields of religious studies and theology. More than 1,000 events—academic sessions, additional meetings, receptions, tours, and workshops—will be offered.

Most sessions will take place at the San Diego Convention Center located at 111 W Harbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92101. Conference hotels are located within easy walking distance of the Convention Center. San Diego is just 120 miles south of Claremont, CA, where the 2014 NSRN Conference takes place 19-20 November. Several NSRN presenters and attendees will also be present at the AAR Annual Meeting.

Podcast of Matthew Engelke’s NSRN Annual Lecture 2012 now available

In partnership with the Religious Studies Project (RSP), we are delighted to announce that a recording of the Nonreligion and Secularity Research Network’s Annual Lecture 2012 with Matthew Engelke is now available. This lecture was recorded on 8 November 2012 at Conway Hall, London on the topic “In spite of Christianity: Humanism and its others in contemporary Britain”

You can access the lecture at the following URL: http://www.religiousstudiesproject.com/2013/08/19/engelke/

This comes as part of a continuing relationship between the NSRN and the RSP – they have previously released recordings of their Annual Lecture 2011, with Jonathan Lanman, and the four keynote lectures from the NSRN Biennial Conference, July 2012. These recordings are available here.

The full text of this lecture is available to download here.

NSRN Annual Lecture Announced: Dr Matthew Engelke, ‘In Spite of Christianity: Humanism and Its Others in Contemporary Britain’

NSRN Annual Lecture 2012

28 November 2012 Doors from 6pm, lecture at 6.30pm, Followed by a drinks reception

Conway Hall, London

This event is free but places are limited.
To register, please email Lois Lee at
l.a.lee@kent.ac.uk

We are very happy to annouce that Dr Matthew Engelke will be our guest speaker at our annual lecture, this year to be held November 2012 in Conway Hall [details above]

In spite of Christianity: Humanism and its others in contemporary Britain – Dr Matthew Engelke

What do we talk about when we talk about religion? What do we recognize as essential and specific to any given faith, and why? In this lecture, I address these questions by drawing on fieldwork among humanists in Britain, paying particular attention to humanism’s relation to Christianity. In one way or another, humanists often position themselves in relation to Christianity. In a basic way, this has to do with humanists’ commitment to secularism—the differentiation of church and state. In more complex ways, though, it also has to do with an effort to move “beyond” Christianity—to encourage a world in which reason takes the place of revelation—while often, at the same time, recognizing what’s worth saving and even fostering from the legacies of faith. All these various relations and perspectives suggest how we should understand social life in contemporary Britain as what it is in spite of Christianity—and not.

Dr. Engelke has recently completed a year of ethnographic fieldwork in the offices of the British Humanist Association [BHA] and is soon to publish his findings. As part of this research project Dr Engelke worked with BHA accredited celebrants and also trained as a funeral celebrant. This work leads the way for a happily increasing number of similar research projects and this will be further encouraged by the recent launch the Programme for the Study of Religion and Nonreligion at LSE, which is coordinated by Dr. Engelke .