[CFP] Atheism, Agnosticism, and Non-Religious Worldviews: Theoretical Models and Psychological Measurement

The central focus of this special issue of Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, with guest editors Ralph W. Hood Jr., Heinz Streib, and Thomas J. Coleman III, is to challenge psychologists and cognitive scientists to move beyond atheism and agnosticism by investigating “non-religious worldviews” as full-fledged constructs rather than as a solely negative identity.

We invite manuscripts (theoretical, empirical, and method) focused on exploring atheism, agnosticism, and non-religion from multiple perspectives by addressing the question of complexity and multidimensionality in measurement, psychological mechanisms, and theoretical models.

Topics of specific interest are

  • Psychometric measures of non-religious worldviews
  • Atheist and agnostic “spirituality.” Can nonbelievers be “spiritual?”
  • Computer models of atheism
  • Comparative studies of atheists and theists
  • Quantifying and categorizing types of nonbelief
  • Atheism and analytical thinking
  • Moving beyond stigma and discrimination
  • Non-religion in childhood and adolescence
  • A framework for “implicit atheism?”
  • Do agnostics differ psychologically from atheists?
  • Atheism, agnosticism, and non-religious prosociality
  • Atheism, a next step in human evolution?
  • Nonbelief as a complex, adaptive system?
  • Atheism, health, and well-being
  • Atheism and the autism spectrum

Deadlines

  • March 31, 2017: letter of intent submission
  • September 15, 2017: submission of selected articles

More information: http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/rel/call-for-papers-atheism.aspx

 

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[CFP] SocRel Response Day 2016

SocRel Response Day 2016: Connecting for Change: emerging research and policy on religion and belief in the public sphere

Friday 21st October, 10 a.m. -4 p.m.

BSA Meeting Room, Imperial Wharf, London

Keynote Speaker: Professor Tariq Modood (University of Bristol)

The public sphere has been both prominent and turbulent in recent times, and in common with other interests and disciplines, the study of religion and belief has been exploring the questions which are raised. From the role of faith in public life, to media representations, legal cases and controversies, and the future of school RE, a plethora of research and reports has been underway which connect religion and belief with policy and practice. This event will present key examples, with an emphasis on sociology of religion, including as it connects with other disciplines, and with policy and practice.

The goal is to explore the connections between religion and belief research, policy and the public sphere through presentations, questions and discussions. We invite proposals for papers and/or (small) panels of 40 minutes (including time for questions), which present research which has connected with – or is planned to – any aspect of policy or practice (such as education, health, housing, welfare, law, employment, politics, government and others).

Registration now open: http://portal.britsoc.co.uk/public/event/eventBooking.aspx?id=EVT10587

Key Dates:

  • Abstract submission closes: 9th September 2016
  • Decision notification: 13th September 2016
  • Registration closes: 7th October 2016

To deliver a paper, please send an abstract of no more than 250 words, alongside a biographical note of no more than 50 words. To deliver a panel, please send an abstract of no more than 500 words alongside a biographical note of no more than 50 words for each contributor. Please send abstracts to Professor Adam Dinham at a.dinham@gold.ac.uk by Friday 9th September 2016.

Costs: £36.00 for BSA members; £41 for Socrel members; £46.00 for non-members; £15 for BSA Concessionary members; £20.00 for Socrel Concessionary members; £25.00 for non-members concessionary.

Should you have any queries about the day, please do not hesitate to contact the event organizers, Professor Adam Dinham a.dinham@gold.ac.uk or Rachael Shillitoe r.shillitoe@worc.ac.uk. For further details, visit the SocRel website www.socrel.org.uk.  For further details about the BSA visit www.britsoc.co.uk

The European Conference on Ethics, Religion & Philosophy 2016

The Waterfront Hotel, Brighton, United Kingdom

Monday, July 4 – Wednesday, July 6, 2016

Abstract Submission Deadline: March 1, 2016

Registration Deadline for Presenters: June 1, 2016

Conference Theme and Streams

 

Conference Theme: “Justice”

The conference theme for ECERP2016 is “Justice”, and the organisers encourage submissions that approach this theme from a variety of perspectives. However, the submission of other topics for consideration is welcome and we also encourage sessions across a variety of interdisciplinary and theoretical perspectives.

Submissions are organised into the following thematic streams:

  • Philosophy – Philosophy and Religion
  • Philosophy – Philosophy and the Arts
  • Philosophy – Philosophy and Public Policy
  • Philosophy – Philosophy and Technology
  • Philosophy – Philosophy and Culture
  • Philosophy – Philosophy and Education
  • Philosophy – Philosophy and Peace Studies
  • Philosophy – Comparative Philosophy
  • Philosophy – Linguistics, Language and Philosophy
  • Ethics – Medical Ethics
  • Ethics – Business and Management Ethics
  • Ethics – Ethics in Education
  • Ethics – Ethics, Law, and Justice
  • Ethics – Ethics and Globalization
  • Ethics – Ethics and Science
  • Ethics – Comparative Ethics
  • Ethics – Linguistics, Language and Ethics
  • Religion – Theism and Atheism
  • Religion – Feminism and Religious Traditions
  • Religion – Religion and Education
  • Religion – Religion and Peace Studies
  • Religion – Mysticism, Faith, and Scientific Culture
  • Religion – Interfaith Dialogue
  • Religion – Comparative Religion
  • Religion – Linguistics, Language and Religion
  • Interdisciplinary – Conflict Resolution and Mediation Studies

How to Submit

  • Register with our online submission system.
  • Create your account. Your email address will be used as your username and you will be asked to submit a password.
  • Submit your abstract of no more than 250 words, choosing from the presentation formats listed below (Individual, Poster or Virtual).
  • Submit well before the submission deadline in order to benefit from Early Bird rates.
  • Your proposal will normally be reviewed within two to three weeks after undergoing a double blind peer review. Those who submit near the extended deadline will usually receive results by March 15, 2016.
  • If your proposal is accepted you will be invited to register for the conference. Upon payment of the registration fee, you will be sent a confirmation email receipt.

CFP: Sociology of Religion Group

Call for Papers
San Antonio, Texas
November 19-22, 2016
Statement of Purpose:
The Sociology of Religion Group of the American Academy of Religion serves as a bridge between religious studies and the subdiscipline of sociology of religion. It functions as a two-way conduit not only to import sociological research into religious studies but also to export the research of religious studies into both the subdiscipline and the broader field of sociology. Only through a cross-fertilization transgressing departmental boundaries can there be breakthroughs in research in both fields. The group has a wide conception of sociology of religion. It is open to a multiplicity of paradigms and methodologies utilized in the subfield and sociology more broadly: theoretical as well as empirical, quantitative, qualitative, and comparative-historical. By liaising with other Program Units, the Sociology of Religion Group is able to bring the rich diversity of critical and analytical perspectives that are housed in the American Academy of Religion into mainstream sociology of religion. Conversely, it aims to provide scholars of the study of religion with a deeper understanding of the landscape of sociology of religion.
Theory, Method, and their Application:
Sociology of Religion as part of a larger discipline is marked by a canonization of its theory and its division by paradigms and methodologies–whether these be the classics (Weber and Durkheim), the old paradigm (functionalism and social constructionism), or the new paradigm (rational choice) on the one hand or quantitative, qualitative, or historical-comparative sociology on the other. As it intersects with sociology of religion, the study of religion has drawn from theories and methodologies in conversation with sociology, anthropology, critical theory, psychology, history, and other related disciplines. We are interested both in papers that utilize the methods and theories in the study of religion and bring them into the sociological canon as well as those that help religious studies gain a better grasp of the sociological theory of religion. We encourage papers that exploit both the theory and methodology of sociology of religion and religious studies and use them as frames for analysis of concrete cases. In particular, we request papers that touch upon social divisions examining race, class, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, region, age, etc.
Internationalism and Diversity:
Critics of sociology of religion have pointed out that the field is dominated by North Americans scholars primarily interested in Protestantism. The discipline of religious studies provides a clear antidote to these perceived limitations. Therefore, we encourage contributions from academics who study the various religious traditions around the world as well as those studying North American religious communities. In particular, we would like submissions from scholars from all academic ranks across the lines of nationality, region, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, etc.
Call for Papers:
The Sociology of Religion Group (SOR) invites both panel and paper proposals across a wide range of topics of interest to both the sociology of religion and religious studies and are particularly interested in papers, which speak to both thereby encouraging increased dialogue between them. In particular, this year’s CFP expresses interest in the following topics:
• Following the theme of AAR’s 2016 annual meetings, the Sociology of Religion Group invites papers that address the multi-dimensions of “Revolutionary Love.” This includes but is not limited to love communism (or the communism of love), brotherly/sisterly love, or love as an impulse for social change. Conversely, it could include the inverse hypothesis – where love is not revolutionary at all but is egoistic or narcissistic (self-love), where revolutions are not based on love but on hate, where love is harmful and tears down dreams rather than build them up. Finally, papers could contain a synthesis addressing the contradictory impulses of revolutionary love – e.g. paradoxical reflections of the religious adage to love thy enemy.
• Social and Religious Movements and/or Social Movements Theory and Religious Movements Theory
• Competing Canons within the Sociology of Religion and Religious Studies
• Theory and Methodology including issues of reproducibility, validity, and empiricism
• Religion and the Public Sphere
• Religion and Education including but not limited to “Religion and Education in Pluralistic Societies” or “Religion and Education in the Postsecular Age.”
• In a co-sponsored paper session, the Quaker Studies Group and Sociology of Religion Group invite proposals on normative religious identity and notions of the ‘true Church.’ We are interested in papers that utilize sociological theories and methods in the analysis of this topic. We are particularly interested in the following questions: What mechanisms do religious groups use to establish normative identities, particularly against deviants or schismatics within their own group? How is ‘membership’ and ‘authenticity’ counted and measured? What types of authority are used to sustain particular identities and how are these operationalized within the group? How are notions of ‘the world’ constructed and sustained, and how are these notions adapted when they no longer serve their original purpose (for example during the processes of denominationalization or internal secularization)?
• The topics mentioned above are meant merely as suggestions. We encourage submissions of all papers that utilize sociological theories, methods, and questions in their analysis of religion. We are particularly interested in papers that address issues of inequalities of race, class, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, or those that utilize critical paradigms including but not limited to critical theory, Marxism, feminism, queer theory, post-colonialism, post-structuralism, and environmentalism.
Publication:
The Sociology of Religion Group of AAR regularly co-sponsors panels with the peer-reviewed print and online journal Critical Research on Religion (CRR) (http://crr.sagepub.com). Published by SAGE Publications, over 2600 libraries worldwide have subscriptions to the journal. Presenters of promising papers in SOR panels will be invited to turn their papers into articles and submit them for peer review to CRR.
Deadline for Submissions: Tuesday, March 1, 2016
Leadership:
 
Co-Chairs:
Rebekka King (Middle Tennessee State University) rebekka.king@mtsu.edu
Warren S. Goldstein (Harvard University) goldstein@criticaltheoryofreligion.org
Steering Committee:
Afe Adogame (Princeton University)
Courtney Bender (Columbia University)
David Feltmate (Auburn University)
Volkhard Krech (Ruhr-Universität Bochum)
Katja Rakow (Universiteit Utrecht)
Randy Reed (Appalachian State University)
For questions or support, email: support@aarweb.org

SocRel Response Day 2015: The Future of Learning about Religion and Belief

SocRel Response Day 2015: The Future of Learning about Religion and Belief

Thursday 5th November 2015, 10 a.m. -4 p.m.

BSA Meeting Room, Imperial Wharf, London

The 2015 SocRel Response Study Day will explore the future of learning about religion and belief. The symposium is organised by SocRel, the BSA Sociology of Religion Study Group.

 For registration please click HERE.

 Speakers include: Professor Robert Jackson (Warwick University), Dr Matthew Francis (Lancaster University), Martha Shaw (Goldsmiths). More speakers will be announced soon.

 In light of the continued focus on learning about religion, not just in schools but also in wider society, the SocRel response day will explore the future of learning about religion and belief from a variety of perspectives, reflecting not only on what the future might hold, but also considering what knowledge we need for encountering religion in the modern world today.

Despite the long held assumption that we live in an increasingly secular society, the continued presence and visibility of religion in both the public and private sphere means that religion is still as significant and important as ever. As we encounter religion in everyday spaces and places throughout our lives, understanding and awareness about faith traditions is necessary for all sorts of professions, sectors and organisations. However, after decades of silence on the subject, many are lacking this essential knowledge. This coupled with suspicion and anxiety about religion, fuelled by media outlets and political agendas, means that we are increasingly ill-equipped to talk about religion comfortably and confidently in our daily lives.

In an increasingly diverse and multi faith society, it is vital that we have the necessary knowledge to understand the various faiths and religious practices in our world. Religion permeates most if not all areas of life and cannot be simply syphoned out or compartmentalised. As such we need to have insight and awareness about religion for everyday life situations and this learning should not start and finish in schools; we need a continued education. But what expertise do we need and how should we learn about this? Would a social worker need to know the same as a lawyer? Is ‘religious talk’ the same in politics as it is in business? And if we are to have different levels or types of ‘religious literacy’, how do we ensure accuracy and consistency within such learning schemes?

The SocRel response day aims to consider this through a series of presentations and plenary discussions, covering a range of topics related to the future of learning about religion and belief. The day will be highly participative and engaged. The symposium will be organised as a single stream so that the day is as much about discussion as it is about presentation.

Costs: BSA Member £36; SocRel Member £41; Non-member £46; BSA concessionary £15; SocRel concessionary £20; Non-member concessionary £25

Lunch is provided

Should you have any queries about the day, please do not hesitate to contact the event organisers, Professor Adam Dinham a.dinham@goldsmiths.ac.uk or Rachael Shillitoe r.shillitoe@worc.ac.uk

Rachael

SocRel Conference and Events Officer

CFP: ISORECEA 2016 Conference

International Study of Religion in Eastern and Central Europe Association and European Sociological Association Research Network 34 (Sociology of Religion) in cooperation with Department of Sociology University of Zadar and Croatian Sociological Association

 CALL FOR PAPERS

 12th ISORECEA conference & ESA RN34 mid-term conference

RELIGION AND NON-RELIGION IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIETIES

Theoretical, Empirical and Methodological Challenges for Research in Central and Eastern Europe and Beyond

 Zadar, Croatia, April 21-24, 2016

 Both religion and non-religion are subjected to remarkable changes in today’s world. Interplay between historical, cultural, and political occurrences and religion and non-religion challenge theoretical considerations of ongoing processes. Faced with different empirical data around the world secularisation theses have been contested for decades; theoretical debates about religious changes have occupied sociologists of religion. They have sought to better and more accurately understand and explain religious changes in different parts of the globe contemporary. Their points of view differ: privatization thesis, de-privatization thesis, religious economies thesis, religious bricolage, multiple secularities thesis. One angle, non-religion as religious counterpart, has been neglected in sociological research.  Indeed, until the end of the 20th century, it was only Campbell (1971) who gave a comprehensive insight into the sociology of non-religion, while many scholars wrote and published within the strand of the sociology of religion.

Non-religion started to occupy attention of sociologists since the beginning of this century especially in UK and USA influenced by different appearances in Western world: the rise of declared non-religious people, the appearance of so-called a New atheism movement (inspired by books by R. Dawkins, S. Harris, D. Dennett, and C. Hitchens), numerous organizations and associations of non-religious people and their enhanced activities as an alternative to religious conservativism, growing influence of religion in public sphere and fundamentalist expressions of religion connected to terrorism. Researchers mostly based their work on theories of subcultural identities, identity politics and new social movements; yet, some authors also drew on the theory of religious economies. In spite of this strands, non-religion remains theoretically underdeveloped and under-researched. Interesting is the fact that this particularly refers to former communist countries where atheism was enforced as part of the official ideology; more research would have been expected on non-religiosity and atheism there. Independently of the exact geopolitical context, non-religion and in particular the interplay between religion and non-religion in different dimensions seem to be a key for understanding contemporary religious changes.

This international conference would like to encourage scholars from various parts of the world to share their theoretical, empirical and methodological considerations on religion and non-religion and take part in discussion on different related topics, like:

  • Social theory of religion and non-religion
  • Comparative empirical data on religion and non-religion
  • Methodological challenges of research on religion and non-religion
  • Historical development of religion and non-religion
  • Non/religious minority and majority
  • Human rights, religion and non-religion
  • Religion, non-religion and State
  • Religion, non-religion and social inclusion/exclusion
  • Religion and non-religion in the intersectional perspective (involving gender, age, socio-economic aspects, etc.)
  • Religion and non-religion in everyday life
  • Religious and non-religious activism

 Please submit a 200-300 words abstract of your presentation by e-mail to: isorecea2016@idi.hr by November 15, 2015.

If you are interested in a specific topic related to the study of religion and/or non-religion, we encourage you to organize a session/panel. In this case, please submit a 300-400 words proposal with full session details (names and affiliation of contributors, titles of their presentations) by November 15, 2015 to the same email address.

 Key dates

Submission of paper and session/panel proposals – November 15, 2015.
Notification of acceptance and opening of the registration – December 15, 2015.
The final date of the registration for the conference – January 31, 2016.

Final program – February 20, 2016.

 Fees
Membership fees

Please note that in order to present a paper you need to be a member of ISORECEA for the years 2016-2017 or a member of ESA in the year 2016.

 The conference fees are as follows (in EURO):

For members of ISORECEA

List of Countries*

A

B

C

Regular members

80

60

40

Students and unemployed

30

18

12

Retired

40

30

20

* This is according to the Table of Economies used by the International Sociological Association:
http://www.isa-sociology.org/table_c.htm

 For members of ESA

List of countries*

Band 1

Band 2

Country falling under A or Bcategory of ISA**

Country falling under Ccategory of ISA**

Regular members

80

60

40

Early career scholars***

60

60

40

Students and unemployed

30

18

12

Retired

40

30

20

* Band 1 and Band 2 are defined by ESA at: http://www.europeansociology.org/member/

** This is according to the Table of Economies used by the International Sociological Association:
http://www.isa-sociology.org/table_c.htm

*** As defined by ESA at: http://www.europeansociology.org/membership.html

 For those who are not members of ISORECEA or ESA*

List of Countries**

A

B

C

Regular participants

160

120

80

Students and unemployed

80

60

40

Retired

80

60

40

Conference fee paid on the spot

25% higher (each category)

* Only those who do not present a paper can participate in the conference as non-members.

** This is according to the Table of Economies used by the International Sociological Association:
http://www.isa-sociology.org/table_c.htm

 Those accepted for the conference will be asked to pay their fees through the PayPal system at the ISORECEA website. For the information on how to become a member of ISORECEA or ESA, or renew the membership, please visit these organisations’ websites: http://isorecea.net/ orhttp://www.europeansociology.org/. The information about accommodation and the conference venue will be given in the second half of December 2015. In case of any earlier questions, please send an email to: isorecea2016@idi.hr.

 Miklós Tomka Award

 The ISORECEA Board has established the Miklós Tomka Award to honour Miklós Tomka, the internationally acknowledged and widely esteemed scholar of religion specializing in the Central and Eastern European region, who died unexpectedly in 2010.

 The Award is granted based on a competitive basis for the best conference paper submitted to the award committee. The paper should refer to the conference theme. The competition is open to early career scholars, with a special focus on PhD students. The Award comprises:

 – The publication of the paper in the ISORECEA on-line journal Religion and Society in Central and Eastern Europe;

– Exemption from the conference fee;

– Covering accommodation costs at the conference.

 Early career scholars interested in entering the competition are invited to submit their full papers to the email address isorecea2016@idi.hr by January 10, 2016. The winner will be announced by January 31, 2016, which is the final date for registration for being on the program of the conference.

 Papers submitted for the Award should be between 5,000 and 7,000 words long and should strictly follow the rules applying to papers submitted to the ISORECEA journal Religion and Society in Central and Eastern Europe. For details see:http://www.rascee.net/index.php/rascee/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

We are looking forward to receiving your papers!

ISORCEA President                                         ESA RN34 Vice-President                              President of the Local Committee

Dinka Marinović Jerolimov                           Roberta Ricucci                                               Siniša Zrinščak

CFP: Rethinking Boundaries in the Study of Religion and Politics

Postgraduate Conference: Rethinking Boundaries in the Study of Religion and Politics

11-12 September 2015

University of Aberdeen

Submission Deadline: 19 June 2015

A common approach to the study of religion and politics frames the inquiry using boundaries. Such boundaries include religion/secular, private/public, belief/practice and theism/atheism, to name just a few. It may be argued that these categorisations are analytically useful in understanding social phenomena because, for example, what is ‘religious’ should be analysed in relation to what is ‘secular.’ Another approach may instead point to the problem with the construction of such binaries in that empirically these distinctions become blurred, so that framing an action, for example as ‘public’ or ‘private’, does not reflect the diversity of human experience. Continue reading