[Event] NSRN Annual Lecture 2016

NSRN Annual Lecture 2016: Is atheism a religion?

Psychological & Anthropological Perspectives.

 

This panel will consider atheism and religion from the perspectives of psychology and anthropology and will seek to bring scientific theory and evidence to bear on these questions and establish how it might (and might not) make sense to liken atheism to a religion.

Speakers include:

Dr Miguel Farias, Coventry University

Professor Christopher French, Goldsmiths College, University of London

Dr Jonathan Lanman, Queen’s University Belfast

Dr Lois Lee, UCL (chair)

 

The event will take place at UCL – 6pm, 2 December 2016.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/nsrn-annual-lecture-is-atheism-a-religion-registration-28392936036

Advertisements

Events: FORUM ON RELIGION SEMINARS

Britain’s New Religious Landscape

Speaker: Professor Linda Woodhead (Lancaster University)

Chair: Dr Matthew Engelke (LSE)

Date and Time: 7 November 2012, 16.30-18.00

Venue: Seligman Library, Old Building, LSE

Professor Woodhead argues that a profound shift has taken place in the religious landscape of Great Britain since the late 1980s, a shift whose significance has been highlighted by research on the AHRC/ESRC Religion and Society Programme. The dominant mode of religion in this country is now one which differs profoundly from the Reformation mode of religion, which was modernised and ‘purified’ in the course of the 20th century. Professor Woodhead identifies key features of the new post-Reformation form of religion – its organisational, magical, and moral aspects – and shows how its co-existence with older Reformation forms of religion explains a great deal about the landscape we now inhabit.

The seminar by Linda Woodhead on 7 November is an opportunity to interact with one of the leading sociologists of religion in the world, and someone who has a unique vantage point on religion and society, via her stewardship of the AHRC/ESRC programme. The seminar room holds about 40 people: don’t miss this chance to hear one of Britain’s foremost sociologists within the context of a seminar setting, and come early to avoid disappointment.

 

 Salafi Islam, Online Ethics and the Future of the Egyptian Revolution

Speaker: Professor Charles Hirschkind (University of California, Berkeley)

Chair: Dr Mathijs Pelkmans (LSE)

Date and Time: 8 November 2012, 18.30-20.00

Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE

This event is co-sponsored with the Department of Anthropology

In this public lecture, Professor Hirschkind, one of the most influential anthropologists of his generation, looks at the politics of the Salafi movement in Egypt in relation to changing practices of religious media use. The movement is the political face of a much broader and diverse current within Egyptian society, one grounded less in a specific tradition within Islam than in a grassroots movement centred on ethical reform. This is a rare visit for Charles to the UK, and his perspective on Salafi Islam is one you’ll not want to miss.

For more information see the website of the Programme for the Study of Religion and Non-Religion

 

With Good Reason? A Debate on the Foundations of Ethics

Speakers: Dr Julian Baggini, Canon Dr Angus Ritchie, and Dr Mark Vernon

Date and Time: 6 December 2012, 18.30-20.00

Venue: Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House, LSE

This event is co-sponsored with Theos.

Religious and secular philosophers have long debated whether ethics have an objective basis (moral realism) or a relative basis (moral relativism). But in terms of the first, does theism or atheism offer a better basis for ‘moral realism’In this debate, a theist, an atheist and an agnostic debate this question in what promises to be a lively and (perhaps) spirited exchange.

 

Event: TOMORROW – ‘Ethics as Piety’, Webb Keane‏

Speaker: Webb Keane (University of Michigan)
Chair: Charles Stafford (London School of Economics)

Date: 27 June 2012, 18.00-19.30

Venue: London School of Economics, New Academic Building Room LG.09 (off Lincoln’s Inn Fields)

Sponsored by the Anthropology Department and the Programme for the Study of Religion and Non-Religion.

Assuming that what we call “religion” and “ethics” are in principle distinct from each other, what is the conceptual relationship between them? What are the historical pathways along which the two often seem to converge? What are the social implications of that convergence where it occurs? And when they converge, what remainder escapes the conflation of these two? These are, of course, very large questions, whose investigation requires substantial empirical and conceptual work. In the interests of carrying out a preliminary ground-clearing, this talk is confined to reflections on a limited number of texts. Discussion of these texts will centre on how certain traditions within Islam and Protestant Christianity objectify ethics in ways that render them cognitively explicit and thus expose them to pressures toward rationalisation, generalisation, and abstraction. But these traditions also expect ethics to guide everyday life, in all its concrete particularity, with potentially paradoxical consequences.

The event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis.

See www2.lse.ac.uk/anthropology/research/PRNR/Events/events.aspx for more details

If you have any queries regarding this event, please contact Dr Matthew Engelke (m.engelke@lse.ac.uk)

Event: “Ethics as Piety” Webb Keane hosted by LSE – All Welcome

Please see below for the upcoming Forum on Religion event.

“Ethics as Piety”

Speaker: Webb Keane (University of Michigan)
Chair: Charles Stafford (London School of Economics)

Date: 27 June 2012, 18.00-19.30

Venue: London School of Economics, New Academic Building Room LG.09 (off Lincoln’s Inn Fields)

Sponsored by the Anthropology Department and the Programme for the Study of Religion and Non-Religion.

Assuming that what we call “religion” and “ethics” are in principle distinct from each other, what is the conceptual relationship between them? What are the historical pathways along which the two often seem to converge? What are the social implications of that convergence where it occurs? And when they converge, what remainder escapes the conflation of these two? These are, of course, very large questions, whose investigation requires substantial empirical and conceptual work. In the interests of carrying out a preliminary ground-clearing, this talk is confined to reflections on a limited number of texts. Discussion of these texts will centre on how certain traditions within Islam and Protestant Christianity objectify ethics in ways that render them cognitively explicit and thus expose them to pressures toward rationalisation, generalisation, and abstraction. But these traditions also expect ethics to guide everyday life, in all its concrete particularity, with potentially paradoxical consequences.

The event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis.

See here for more details

If you have any queries regarding this event, please contact Dr Matthew Engelke (m.engelke@lse.ac.uk)


First events listed for the new programme of the Study of Religion and Non-Religion at the London School of Economics.

The Forum on Religion is pleased to announce the establishment of a new Programme for the Study of Religion and Non-Religion at the London School of Economics.

The Programme for the Study of Religion and Non-Religion, based in the Department of Anthropology, aims to bring together staff and research students from across LSE, and within the wider academic and policy communities, working on issues to do with religion, secularism, and “non-religious” practices, beliefs, and traditions. The main aims of the Programme are to:

• Foster and provide a framework for primary research

• Facilitate academic and public discussions on issues relevant to religion, atheism, secularism, humanism and post-humanism

• Provide a platform for researchers and stakeholders to showcase and communicate their findings to broader academic, public, and public policy audiences

The Forum on Religion is becoming part of the new Programme for the Study of Religion and Non-Religion and will continue to host public lectures and an interdisciplinary seminar series. For more information on the Programme, visit the website or contact Dr Matthew Engelke at m.engelke@lse.ac.uk

We will continue to advertise Forum on Religion events through their mailing list.

FORTHCOMING EVENTS

Seminar

Religion and Non-Religion: A Roundtable Discussion
With Dr Amanda van Eck (INFORM), Dr Matthew Engelke (LSE Anthropology), Dr Simon Glendinning (LSE, European Institute), Dr John Madeley (LSE Government), Rev James Walters (LSE Chaplaincy)
9 May 2012, 16.30-18.00
Seligman Library, Department of Anthropology, Old Building, LSE

Public lectures

At the Origins of Modern Atheism
Speaker: Rev Dr Giles Fraser
Discussant: Prof John Gray (London School of Economics)
Chair: Dr Matthew Engelke (London School of Economics)
6 June 2012, 18.30-20.00
Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE
This event will be followed by a reception and marks the public launch of the Programme for the Study of Religion and Non-Religion

Ethics as Piety
Speaker: Prof Webb Keane (University of Michigan)
Discussant: Dr Faisal Devji (Oxford University)
27 June 2012, 18.00-19.30
New Academic Building LG.09, LSE

ALL EVENTS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Publication: Islam and the Politics of Secularism and Varieties of Secularism in Asia

Islam and the Politics of Secularism

The Caliphate and Middle Eastern Modernization in the Early 20th Century

Nurullah Ardic

Published 16th January 2012 by Routledge – 394 pages

This book examines the process of secularization in the Middle East in the late 19th and early 20th century through an analysis of the transformation and abolition of Islamic Caliphate. Focusing on debates in both the center of the Caliphate and its periphery, the author argues that the relationship between Islam and secularism was one of accommodation, rather than simply conflict and confrontation, because Islam was the single most important source of legitimation in the modernization of the Middle East.

Through detailed analysis of both official documents and the writings of the intellectuals who contributed to reforms in the Empire, the author first examines the general secularization process in the Ottoman Empire from the late 18th century up to the end of the 1920s. He then presents an in-depth analysis of a crucial case of secularization: the demise of Islamic Caliphate. Drawing upon a wide range of secondary and primary sources on the Caliphate and the wider process of political modernization, he employs discourse analysis and comparative-historical methods to examine how the Caliphate was first transformed into a “spiritual” institution and then abolished in 1924 by Turkish secularists. Ardiç also demonstrates how the book’s argument is applicable to wider secularization and modernization processes in the Middle East.

Deriving insights from history, anthropology, Islamic law and political science, the book will engage a critical mass of scholars interested in Middle Eastern studies, political Islam, secularization and the near-global revival of religion as well as the historians of Islam and late-Ottoman Empire, and those working in the field of historical sociology and the sociology of religion as a case study.

Varieties of Secularism in Asia

Anthropological Explorations of Religion, Politics and the Spiritual

Edited by Nils Ole Bubandt, Martijn Van Beek

Published 29th September 2011 by Routledge – 261 pages
Varieties of Secularism is an ethnographically rich, theoretically well-informed, and intellectually coherent volume which builds off the work of Talal Asad, Charles Taylor, and others who have engaged the issue of secularism(s) and in socio-political life. The volume seeks to examine theories of secularism/secularity and examine concrete ethnographic cases in order to further the theoretical discussion.

Whereas Taylor’s magisterial work draws up the conditions and problems of a belief in God in Western modernity, it leaves unexplored the challenges posed by the spiritual in modernity outside of the North Atlantic rim. This anthology seeks to begin that task. It does so by suggesting that the kind of secularity described by Taylor is only one amongst others. By attending to the shifting relationship between proper religion and ‘bad faiths’; between politically valorised and embarrassing spiritual phenomena; between the new visibilities and silences of magic, ancestors, and religion in democratic politics, this book seeks to outline the particular formations of secularism that have become possible in Asia from China to Indonesia and from Bahrain to Timor-Leste.

Cultural Anthropology – Secularism

Following the recent update on our bibliography, please find details of a further special series of essays on Secularism from the November issue of Cultural Anthropology which will be included shortly. The essays focus on theories of Secularism and possibilities for its practical application within the field of Anthropology, using the work of Asad and Connolley as a theoretical frame.

SECULARISM

Introduction
Charles Hirschkind and Matthew Scherer
Cultural Anthropology November 2011, Vol. 26, No. 4: 620.

Landmarks in the Critical Study of Secularism

Matthew Scherer
Cultural Anthropology November 2011, Vol. 26, No. 4: 621-632.

Is There a Secular Body?
Charles Hirschkind
Cultural Anthropology November 2011, Vol. 26, No. 4: 633-647.

Some Theses on Secularism
William E. Connolley
Cultural Anthropology November 2011, Vol. 26, No. 4: 648-656.

Thinking About the Secular Body, Pain, and Liberal Politics
Talal Asad
Cultural Anthropology November 2011, Vol. 26, No. 4: 657-675.