The European Conference on Ethics, Religion & Philosophy 2016

The Waterfront Hotel, Brighton, United Kingdom

Monday, July 4 – Wednesday, July 6, 2016

Abstract Submission Deadline: March 1, 2016

Registration Deadline for Presenters: June 1, 2016

Conference Theme and Streams

 

Conference Theme: “Justice”

The conference theme for ECERP2016 is “Justice”, and the organisers encourage submissions that approach this theme from a variety of perspectives. However, the submission of other topics for consideration is welcome and we also encourage sessions across a variety of interdisciplinary and theoretical perspectives.

Submissions are organised into the following thematic streams:

  • Philosophy – Philosophy and Religion
  • Philosophy – Philosophy and the Arts
  • Philosophy – Philosophy and Public Policy
  • Philosophy – Philosophy and Technology
  • Philosophy – Philosophy and Culture
  • Philosophy – Philosophy and Education
  • Philosophy – Philosophy and Peace Studies
  • Philosophy – Comparative Philosophy
  • Philosophy – Linguistics, Language and Philosophy
  • Ethics – Medical Ethics
  • Ethics – Business and Management Ethics
  • Ethics – Ethics in Education
  • Ethics – Ethics, Law, and Justice
  • Ethics – Ethics and Globalization
  • Ethics – Ethics and Science
  • Ethics – Comparative Ethics
  • Ethics – Linguistics, Language and Ethics
  • Religion – Theism and Atheism
  • Religion – Feminism and Religious Traditions
  • Religion – Religion and Education
  • Religion – Religion and Peace Studies
  • Religion – Mysticism, Faith, and Scientific Culture
  • Religion – Interfaith Dialogue
  • Religion – Comparative Religion
  • Religion – Linguistics, Language and Religion
  • Interdisciplinary – Conflict Resolution and Mediation Studies

How to Submit

  • Register with our online submission system.
  • Create your account. Your email address will be used as your username and you will be asked to submit a password.
  • Submit your abstract of no more than 250 words, choosing from the presentation formats listed below (Individual, Poster or Virtual).
  • Submit well before the submission deadline in order to benefit from Early Bird rates.
  • Your proposal will normally be reviewed within two to three weeks after undergoing a double blind peer review. Those who submit near the extended deadline will usually receive results by March 15, 2016.
  • If your proposal is accepted you will be invited to register for the conference. Upon payment of the registration fee, you will be sent a confirmation email receipt.

CFP: Sociology of Religion Group

Call for Papers
San Antonio, Texas
November 19-22, 2016
Statement of Purpose:
The Sociology of Religion Group of the American Academy of Religion serves as a bridge between religious studies and the subdiscipline of sociology of religion. It functions as a two-way conduit not only to import sociological research into religious studies but also to export the research of religious studies into both the subdiscipline and the broader field of sociology. Only through a cross-fertilization transgressing departmental boundaries can there be breakthroughs in research in both fields. The group has a wide conception of sociology of religion. It is open to a multiplicity of paradigms and methodologies utilized in the subfield and sociology more broadly: theoretical as well as empirical, quantitative, qualitative, and comparative-historical. By liaising with other Program Units, the Sociology of Religion Group is able to bring the rich diversity of critical and analytical perspectives that are housed in the American Academy of Religion into mainstream sociology of religion. Conversely, it aims to provide scholars of the study of religion with a deeper understanding of the landscape of sociology of religion.
Theory, Method, and their Application:
Sociology of Religion as part of a larger discipline is marked by a canonization of its theory and its division by paradigms and methodologies–whether these be the classics (Weber and Durkheim), the old paradigm (functionalism and social constructionism), or the new paradigm (rational choice) on the one hand or quantitative, qualitative, or historical-comparative sociology on the other. As it intersects with sociology of religion, the study of religion has drawn from theories and methodologies in conversation with sociology, anthropology, critical theory, psychology, history, and other related disciplines. We are interested both in papers that utilize the methods and theories in the study of religion and bring them into the sociological canon as well as those that help religious studies gain a better grasp of the sociological theory of religion. We encourage papers that exploit both the theory and methodology of sociology of religion and religious studies and use them as frames for analysis of concrete cases. In particular, we request papers that touch upon social divisions examining race, class, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, region, age, etc.
Internationalism and Diversity:
Critics of sociology of religion have pointed out that the field is dominated by North Americans scholars primarily interested in Protestantism. The discipline of religious studies provides a clear antidote to these perceived limitations. Therefore, we encourage contributions from academics who study the various religious traditions around the world as well as those studying North American religious communities. In particular, we would like submissions from scholars from all academic ranks across the lines of nationality, region, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, etc.
Call for Papers:
The Sociology of Religion Group (SOR) invites both panel and paper proposals across a wide range of topics of interest to both the sociology of religion and religious studies and are particularly interested in papers, which speak to both thereby encouraging increased dialogue between them. In particular, this year’s CFP expresses interest in the following topics:
• Following the theme of AAR’s 2016 annual meetings, the Sociology of Religion Group invites papers that address the multi-dimensions of “Revolutionary Love.” This includes but is not limited to love communism (or the communism of love), brotherly/sisterly love, or love as an impulse for social change. Conversely, it could include the inverse hypothesis – where love is not revolutionary at all but is egoistic or narcissistic (self-love), where revolutions are not based on love but on hate, where love is harmful and tears down dreams rather than build them up. Finally, papers could contain a synthesis addressing the contradictory impulses of revolutionary love – e.g. paradoxical reflections of the religious adage to love thy enemy.
• Social and Religious Movements and/or Social Movements Theory and Religious Movements Theory
• Competing Canons within the Sociology of Religion and Religious Studies
• Theory and Methodology including issues of reproducibility, validity, and empiricism
• Religion and the Public Sphere
• Religion and Education including but not limited to “Religion and Education in Pluralistic Societies” or “Religion and Education in the Postsecular Age.”
• In a co-sponsored paper session, the Quaker Studies Group and Sociology of Religion Group invite proposals on normative religious identity and notions of the ‘true Church.’ We are interested in papers that utilize sociological theories and methods in the analysis of this topic. We are particularly interested in the following questions: What mechanisms do religious groups use to establish normative identities, particularly against deviants or schismatics within their own group? How is ‘membership’ and ‘authenticity’ counted and measured? What types of authority are used to sustain particular identities and how are these operationalized within the group? How are notions of ‘the world’ constructed and sustained, and how are these notions adapted when they no longer serve their original purpose (for example during the processes of denominationalization or internal secularization)?
• The topics mentioned above are meant merely as suggestions. We encourage submissions of all papers that utilize sociological theories, methods, and questions in their analysis of religion. We are particularly interested in papers that address issues of inequalities of race, class, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, or those that utilize critical paradigms including but not limited to critical theory, Marxism, feminism, queer theory, post-colonialism, post-structuralism, and environmentalism.
Publication:
The Sociology of Religion Group of AAR regularly co-sponsors panels with the peer-reviewed print and online journal Critical Research on Religion (CRR) (http://crr.sagepub.com). Published by SAGE Publications, over 2600 libraries worldwide have subscriptions to the journal. Presenters of promising papers in SOR panels will be invited to turn their papers into articles and submit them for peer review to CRR.
Deadline for Submissions: Tuesday, March 1, 2016
Leadership:
 
Co-Chairs:
Rebekka King (Middle Tennessee State University) rebekka.king@mtsu.edu
Warren S. Goldstein (Harvard University) goldstein@criticaltheoryofreligion.org
Steering Committee:
Afe Adogame (Princeton University)
Courtney Bender (Columbia University)
David Feltmate (Auburn University)
Volkhard Krech (Ruhr-Universität Bochum)
Katja Rakow (Universiteit Utrecht)
Randy Reed (Appalachian State University)
For questions or support, email: support@aarweb.org

Call for Papers: NSRN 2016 Conference, “Approaching Nonreligion”

The NSRN are delighted to announce their 2016 conference, which will be co-hosted with the ‘Diversity of Nonreligion’ Research Project at the University of Zürich, Switzerland, 7-9 July 2016.

See below for the Call for Papers (deadline 15 January 2016) which can also be downloaded as a PDF. Please share widely.

There is also a dedicated conference webpage that will be updated with information about the conference as and when we have new information: https://nsrn.net/nsrn-conference-2016


 

2016 Conference

Call for Papers

Approaching Nonreligion: Conceptual, methodical, and empirical approaches in a new research field

“The Diversity of Nonreligion” & NSRN Conference 2016

7-9 July 2016, University of Zürich, Switzerland

For some years now, nonreligious phenomena have not only sparked public, but also scholarly attention. A rising number of scholars have begun to engage with both organized and non-organized forms of nonreligion. We want to use this conference to go beyond the discussion of terms and individual findings to facilitate exchange over different approaches, and engage with the following broader questions:

  • What phenomena are approached in research projects on nonreligion and how is nonreligion construed in different studies?
  • What are central theoretical references for studies on nonreligion, and in what way do scholars engage with related broader debates on religion and secularity?
  • What are methodic and methodological challenges and approaches in concrete empirical research?
  • What scientific traditions and sources of inspiration motivate and guide researchers in the field of nonreligion?
  • In what ways is research on nonreligion entangled with religious-nonreligious contestations?

The conference brings together empirical research with conceptual and methodological reflection, as well as a self-reflexive perspective on the research field itself.

There will be room for both individual papers as well as prepared panels. We welcome scholarly contributions from different scientific fields. Please apply with either an abstract for an individual paper or a proposal for a thematic session (2-4 individual papers). Please name your institutional affiliation if possible. Please send your proposal (200-300 words) to: alexander.blechschmidt@uzh.ch

Deadline for proposals: January 15th 2016, Notification of acceptance: January 30th 2016

Department of Social Anthropology and Cultural Studies (ISEK), University of Zürich, Switzerland (http://www.isek.uzh.ch/index.html)

The Diversity of Nonreligion: Religious-Nonreligious Dynamics in the Contemporary World (http://www.nonreligion.net)

Nonreligion and Secularity Research Network (www.nsrn.net)

Workshop for PhD candidates at the University of Zurich

The Emmy Noether-project “The Diversity of Nonreligion” is organizing a workshop for PhD candidates at the Department of Social Anthropology & Cultural Studies (ISEK) at the University of Zurich. The Workshop will take place on the 13th and 14th of November, right after the NSRN lecture of Jörg Stolz, ‘Outline of a Theory of Religious-Secular Competition‘, on the 12th of November.
The participants of the workshop are PhD students in the fields of social anthropology, sociology, and religious studies, who all study nonreligious, secular and religious phenomena and their entanglements. The PhD projects include studies with a regional focus on China, Germany, India, the Netherlands, the Philippines, Sweden, and the United States.

NSRN Recruiting Website Editor

As part of our ongoing development of the NSRN and our online presence, we are seeking a new member of our online team. This individual will take on the role of Managing Editor, and will be responsible for the general overseeing and maintenance of website, co-ordinating of the NSRN Online team, and undertaking a refurbishment/redevelopment of the existing website.

The successful applicant should:

  • Be involved – whether as a student (of any level), a professional academic, or independent researcher – within the academic study of nonreligion and secularity (broadly conceived)
  • Have a working knowledge of WordPress, in addition to general computing and social media skills.
  • Be a reliable and independent worker, able to both delegate tasks and work as part of a team.

All roles within the NSRN are unpaid; however, we hope that the chance to be involved in a major international hub for the study of nonreligion, secularity and related concepts, the opportunities which accompany this, and the chance to creatively make their mark on our web presence will be acceptable compensation for the efforts of the successful applicant.

If you are interested in this position, please send an academic CV accompanied by a brief note of interest of no more than 500 words detailing your suitability for the role, relevant experience, and any suggestions you may have for further developments of the NSRN’s website and online presence and how you might implement these. These materials, and any questions relating to the position, should be directed to NSRN Co-Director Christopher R. Cotter at c.cotter@lancaster.ac.uk by 6 November 2015.

Please feel free to circulate this advert to relevant colleagues and networks. A PDF can be downloaded below.

NSRN Managing Editor Advert (PDF)

SocRel Response Day 2015: The Future of Learning about Religion and Belief

SocRel Response Day 2015: The Future of Learning about Religion and Belief

Thursday 5th November 2015, 10 a.m. -4 p.m.

BSA Meeting Room, Imperial Wharf, London

The 2015 SocRel Response Study Day will explore the future of learning about religion and belief. The symposium is organised by SocRel, the BSA Sociology of Religion Study Group.

 For registration please click HERE.

 Speakers include: Professor Robert Jackson (Warwick University), Dr Matthew Francis (Lancaster University), Martha Shaw (Goldsmiths). More speakers will be announced soon.

 In light of the continued focus on learning about religion, not just in schools but also in wider society, the SocRel response day will explore the future of learning about religion and belief from a variety of perspectives, reflecting not only on what the future might hold, but also considering what knowledge we need for encountering religion in the modern world today.

Despite the long held assumption that we live in an increasingly secular society, the continued presence and visibility of religion in both the public and private sphere means that religion is still as significant and important as ever. As we encounter religion in everyday spaces and places throughout our lives, understanding and awareness about faith traditions is necessary for all sorts of professions, sectors and organisations. However, after decades of silence on the subject, many are lacking this essential knowledge. This coupled with suspicion and anxiety about religion, fuelled by media outlets and political agendas, means that we are increasingly ill-equipped to talk about religion comfortably and confidently in our daily lives.

In an increasingly diverse and multi faith society, it is vital that we have the necessary knowledge to understand the various faiths and religious practices in our world. Religion permeates most if not all areas of life and cannot be simply syphoned out or compartmentalised. As such we need to have insight and awareness about religion for everyday life situations and this learning should not start and finish in schools; we need a continued education. But what expertise do we need and how should we learn about this? Would a social worker need to know the same as a lawyer? Is ‘religious talk’ the same in politics as it is in business? And if we are to have different levels or types of ‘religious literacy’, how do we ensure accuracy and consistency within such learning schemes?

The SocRel response day aims to consider this through a series of presentations and plenary discussions, covering a range of topics related to the future of learning about religion and belief. The day will be highly participative and engaged. The symposium will be organised as a single stream so that the day is as much about discussion as it is about presentation.

Costs: BSA Member £36; SocRel Member £41; Non-member £46; BSA concessionary £15; SocRel concessionary £20; Non-member concessionary £25

Lunch is provided

Should you have any queries about the day, please do not hesitate to contact the event organisers, Professor Adam Dinham a.dinham@goldsmiths.ac.uk or Rachael Shillitoe r.shillitoe@worc.ac.uk

Rachael

SocRel Conference and Events Officer

NSRN Annual Lecture 2015: Outline of a Theory of Religious-Secular Competition

We are delighted to announce our 2015 Annual Lecture, presented in cooperation with the Department of Social Anthropology & Cultural Studies (ISEK) at the University of Zurich, and the Emmy Noether-project “The Diversity of Nonreligion.”

Outline of a Theory of Religious-Secular Competition

Prof. Dr. Jörg Stolz (University of Lausanne)

Thursday, November 12, 2015, 6pm

Venue: University of Zurich (UZH) Oerlikon Campus Andreasstr. 15, 8050 Zurich Room: AND 3.02/06 (3rd floor)

A flyer can be downloaded here (pdf).

NSRN Annual Lecture