Research Assistant for History of Humanism project (London, UK)

History of Humanism in Britain since 1896

University of Glasgow / Oxford Brookes University

Research Assistant (0.8FTE, 24 months), based London

A research assistant is being sought to work on the above project with Callum Brown (University of Glasgow) and David Nash (Oxford Brookes University). With the support and funding of Humanists UK, the objective is to research the History of British Humanism from c.1896 to the present. The post will be based in London. Full details of the post are on the University of Glasgow jobs site at https://www.gla.ac.uk/it/iframe/jobs/ (and enter ‘Humanists’ in Search) and at http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BJJ357/research-assistant-part-time/ (Note that fuller details are on the Glasgow site.)

Informal queries are welcomed to callum.brown@glasgow.ac.uk

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CFP: Formatting Non-religion in Late Modern Society – Institutional and Legal Perspective (Eurel 2018)

EUREL Conference 2018

University of Oslo

26-27 September 2018

 

  • Submission of abstracts 28 February 2018
  • Notification of results 31 March 2018

 

Formatting Non-religion in Late Modern Society – Institutional and Legal Perspective invites scholars across disciplines to address the conceptualisation and knowledge of nonreligion in the late modern society. The starting point of the conference is that nonreligion is a culturally contingent concept that displays sociocultural variations across different geographical regions and socio-political systems. With an increasing nonreligious population, the maps of religious belonging needs to be reconfigured, which also could impact how both religious and nonreligious affiliations are recognised by the state.

The conference features keynote speeches by Professors Lori Beaman (University of Ottawa) and Lois Lee (University of Kent).

The conference invites papers with approaches based in political science, sociology, and law. Sociological approaches can draw on both quantitative and qualitative research methods. Papers will address any of the following questions:

  • How can nonreligion be defined, and how can the “nones” be grasped and taken into account in studies on religion?
  • How does the sociocultural and religious backdrop of different countries affect the regulation and representation of nonreligion in law and policymaking?
  • Where and how do nonreligious individuals and collectives fit into institutions in contemporary societies?
  • In which ways do services developed to satisfy the existential needs of citizens provided by the state through law and politics (“from above”) – recognise worldviews and sentiments that are something other than religious? How can nonreligious beliefs be addressed by the law?
  • How does nonreligion “from above” affect notions of citizenship and national belonging?

Paper proposals of no more than 300 words can be submitted here by February 28th, 2018. Proposals must specify which conference theme the paper addresses, and indicate the author’s contact information and institutional affiliation.

The Eurel prize will be awarded at the 2018 conference. It is open to PhD students and young researchers (less than 3 years after defence of the doctorate). Specify in your proposal if you are in such a situation.

Authors will be notified by March 31st 2018 if their proposal has been accepted. The organizers will cover accommodation for one night and all meals for presenters. Transportation fees will not be taken in charge.

Papers must be presented in English or French, normally no more than 20 minutes. If possible, the presentation documents will be in the language not used for the presentation. Although not not mandatory for participation, this would be appreciated.

For more information, see the conference website.

NSRN Annual Lecture 2017

Ancestor Worship amongst Today’s Unbelievers

Nonreligious people often experience, and revere, the presence of their deceased relatives. Typically described as ‘religious experience’, the uniqueness of unbelievers’ experiences of the dead are widely misunderstood. In this year’s Nonreligion & Secularity Research Network’s annual lecture Professor Abby Day (Goldsmiths, University of London) discusses new research into the ‘ancestor worship’ of British unbelievers, and asks – what do these experiences tell us about unbelief, nonreligion and the richness of human experience?

The event will be held on 15.45-17.00 Saturday 25 November 2017 at The Beaney House of Art & Knowledge (Canterbury CT1 2RA).

This event is free and open to all. Please register at the eventbrite page.

The NSRN Annual Lecture 2017 is sponsored by the Understanding Unbelief programme, and will be held as part of the Belief, Lost and Found: The Unbelief Café at the Being Human festival. Further details can be found here.

NSRN 2017 lecture flyer

Join NSRN Blog Editorial Team

Do you enjoy reading posts on Nonreligion and Secularity?
Do you have a keen interest in nonreligion and secularity research?
Would you like to become a member of the blog’s editorial team?

We are currently looking to expand and are seeking enthusiastic people to join Nonreligion and Secularity’s editorial team. New team members will have the opportunity to play a dynamic role in the blog’s ongoing development, and its vision for the future.

We welcome applications from people in all stages of their academic career, including postgraduate students and early career researchers.

Deadline for applications is Friday 29th September 2017.

For more information and instructions on applying, see the NSRN assistant editor advert.

[CFP] Atheism, Agnosticism, and Non-Religious Worldviews: Theoretical Models and Psychological Measurement

The central focus of this special issue of Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, with guest editors Ralph W. Hood Jr., Heinz Streib, and Thomas J. Coleman III, is to challenge psychologists and cognitive scientists to move beyond atheism and agnosticism by investigating “non-religious worldviews” as full-fledged constructs rather than as a solely negative identity.

We invite manuscripts (theoretical, empirical, and method) focused on exploring atheism, agnosticism, and non-religion from multiple perspectives by addressing the question of complexity and multidimensionality in measurement, psychological mechanisms, and theoretical models.

Topics of specific interest are

  • Psychometric measures of non-religious worldviews
  • Atheist and agnostic “spirituality.” Can nonbelievers be “spiritual?”
  • Computer models of atheism
  • Comparative studies of atheists and theists
  • Quantifying and categorizing types of nonbelief
  • Atheism and analytical thinking
  • Moving beyond stigma and discrimination
  • Non-religion in childhood and adolescence
  • A framework for “implicit atheism?”
  • Do agnostics differ psychologically from atheists?
  • Atheism, agnosticism, and non-religious prosociality
  • Atheism, a next step in human evolution?
  • Nonbelief as a complex, adaptive system?
  • Atheism, health, and well-being
  • Atheism and the autism spectrum

Deadlines

  • March 31, 2017: letter of intent submission
  • September 15, 2017: submission of selected articles

More information: http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/rel/call-for-papers-atheism.aspx

 

[Event] NSRN Annual Lecture 2016

NSRN Annual Lecture 2016: Is atheism a religion?

Psychological & Anthropological Perspectives.

 

This panel will consider atheism and religion from the perspectives of psychology and anthropology and will seek to bring scientific theory and evidence to bear on these questions and establish how it might (and might not) make sense to liken atheism to a religion.

Speakers include:

Dr Miguel Farias, Coventry University

Professor Christopher French, Goldsmiths College, University of London

Dr Jonathan Lanman, Queen’s University Belfast

Dr Lois Lee, UCL (chair)

 

The event will take place at UCL – 6pm, 2 December 2016.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/nsrn-annual-lecture-is-atheism-a-religion-registration-28392936036

[CFP] SocRel Response Day 2016

SocRel Response Day 2016: Connecting for Change: emerging research and policy on religion and belief in the public sphere

Friday 21st October, 10 a.m. -4 p.m.

BSA Meeting Room, Imperial Wharf, London

Keynote Speaker: Professor Tariq Modood (University of Bristol)

The public sphere has been both prominent and turbulent in recent times, and in common with other interests and disciplines, the study of religion and belief has been exploring the questions which are raised. From the role of faith in public life, to media representations, legal cases and controversies, and the future of school RE, a plethora of research and reports has been underway which connect religion and belief with policy and practice. This event will present key examples, with an emphasis on sociology of religion, including as it connects with other disciplines, and with policy and practice.

The goal is to explore the connections between religion and belief research, policy and the public sphere through presentations, questions and discussions. We invite proposals for papers and/or (small) panels of 40 minutes (including time for questions), which present research which has connected with – or is planned to – any aspect of policy or practice (such as education, health, housing, welfare, law, employment, politics, government and others).

Registration now open: http://portal.britsoc.co.uk/public/event/eventBooking.aspx?id=EVT10587

Key Dates:

  • Abstract submission closes: 9th September 2016
  • Decision notification: 13th September 2016
  • Registration closes: 7th October 2016

To deliver a paper, please send an abstract of no more than 250 words, alongside a biographical note of no more than 50 words. To deliver a panel, please send an abstract of no more than 500 words alongside a biographical note of no more than 50 words for each contributor. Please send abstracts to Professor Adam Dinham at a.dinham@gold.ac.uk by Friday 9th September 2016.

Costs: £36.00 for BSA members; £41 for Socrel members; £46.00 for non-members; £15 for BSA Concessionary members; £20.00 for Socrel Concessionary members; £25.00 for non-members concessionary.

Should you have any queries about the day, please do not hesitate to contact the event organizers, Professor Adam Dinham a.dinham@gold.ac.uk or Rachael Shillitoe r.shillitoe@worc.ac.uk. For further details, visit the SocRel website www.socrel.org.uk.  For further details about the BSA visit www.britsoc.co.uk